Police Raid 50P Orgy for “Public Indecency”

yuri-bathing-by-komone-ushio

Police have stormed a 50P orgy and arrested the organisers for “public indecency,” in spite of the fact the event was held in private at a remote onsen resort.

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The case at issue centres on the 38-year-old organiser of an orgy involving some 50 participants, held in Shikoku’s Kagawa prefecture at a private onsen resort lodge in the prefecture’s mountainous countryside.

90 police officers raided the event and arrested the organisers, charging them with public indecency, but they insist their orgy was perfectly legal. The participants (25 men and 24 women) were not arrested or charged, and reports indicate the gathering was well-mannered and peaceful.

Prosecutors claim the event constituted “public indecency,” but their interpretation of the law is disputed – arguments centre on the legal definition of “public,” defined as “a state where an unspecified or large number of people” are made aware of indecent conduct.

The defence argues a private event held on private property with the only witnesses being the participants themselves cannot possibly constitute public indecency.

Whether group sex constitutes “indecency,” defined as “excessively stimulating carnal desire, sexually shameful to the average person, or contrary to proper sexual morals” is also doubted.

The organiser of the party is adamant no law has been broken:

“I’m not convinced. Group sex itself is not a bad thing. It was not a commercial undertaking, and there were no victims.”

He claims to have started the club, known as “Freedom,” based on personal interest and says it has been operating for 2 years without incident.

The public prosecutor apparently felt it necessary to accompany police on their raid, and is just as adamant they are a bunch of sexual deviants:

“At the time of the party, I was near the lodge and could hear your moaning plain as day!

What if a family went on a trip to a place like that and there was an orgy with 40 people going on?”

The organiser was not having any any of it:

“The participants weren’t all having sex at once. And I am an open person, so I’d just explain to any children that ‘there are some people who like to do that sort of thing’.”

The prosecutor then saw fit to exploit the fact that the organiser is a family man with a wife and child:

“Isn’t your wife angry about what you are getting up to?”

“She’s angry… the case is widely publicised and it’s caused a hassle to my wife and parents. In future I’d like to be more temperate in participating in or running orgies.”

Presumably had an army of police not descended upon the event and prosecutors not dragged his name through the courts, she would be quite happy with his antics…

Japanese courts have previously upheld prosecutions for smaller orgies, but these were based on anti-prostitution laws, as the parties were commercial in nature and typically involved paying male club members attending an event with the organisers laying on female prostitutes.

Just what legitimate basis there is for the prosecution is not clear – applying a law against public indecency to a group of consenting adults having sex in private would apparently make any group sex potentially illegal, whilst basing the prosecution on eavesdropping would outlaw non-silent sex in most of Japan’s thin-walled private homes.

With actual brothels going unmolested as long as they make regular payments to police and teachers able to indecently assault their pupils without facing arrest or even losing their jobs, the application of Japan’s ridiculous sex crime laws seem to rest more on the welfare of civil servants than on any coherent legal basis.


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