Sankaku Complex Forums » General

Windows 8

  1. pilu said:
    IIRC it was in Windows 98, but it was maybe an earlier addition.

    What.

    Posted 1 year ago # Quote
  2. aneko said:
    Alt-F4 has the usual function in Windows 7 of closing the active program, so using it from the Desktop brings up the shutdown option window.

    Odd doesn't work on my win 7 box.

    Anyway you can tell how ofter I needed to use it before win 8.

    Posted 1 year ago # Quote
  3. Char said:

    Good to see someone else who knows what CP/M and Dos are.

    I started using computers when I was 8 and was given a very outdated even back then C64 as my first machine.

    Also would take home old stuff people were throwing out such as an Osborn 1,Apple IIe, and a Morrow MD3.
    I like collection machines from that era.

    Oh don't get me going on how retard UEFI secure boot is how ever invented it should have been promptly dragged into the street and shot.
    At least it they now got it fairly easy to turn off.

    Seriously though Microsoft should offer rebates to those who remove Windows 8 because I have no use for it.

    As for fast booting
    Light versions of Ubuntu like Linux Mint can be configured to boot in under 10 seconds.

    But as Savage said Arch and similar can be even faster.

    That was way above 10 seconds. My Lenovo Y500 with w8 is faster.

    Posted 1 year ago # Quote
  4. Char said:
    I rule with computers

    And then

    Char said:
    ...Unbuntu...

    Last time I checked it was called "Ubuntu"... :(

    If you're actually serious about computers, you will notice after 10 minutes using it, that the cosmetic changes in Windows 8 are quite superficial, and everything is still there. Some of those changes I like, others I dislike, but I haven't yet found anything I could do in 7 that I can't do in 8. Under the hood though, Windows 8 is infinitely better than Windows 7 (yet nobody talks about that, which is what actually matters).

    The funny thing is that Apple is the king when introducing breaking changes, yet nobody complains when a new version comes out and not only nothing works in the new version, but nothing new works in the old version either.

    I don't dig "apps", so I removed all of them, no problem. I wish there was an official supported way of removing all of the craplets that come with OS X like Calendar, Chess, Dictionary, Launchpad, Game Center, Garage Band, iMovie, iTunes, iPhoto et al.

    Regarding Linux, I've never seriously used it on the desktop, so I can't say much, but on the server, Ubuntu Server is my choice, with CentOS and Debian coming at a close second and third. If I have full choice for a server OS, I prefer OpenBSD, with FreeBSD as a close second. For kernel hacking, Plan 9 is by far my first choice.

    Also, all of the hardware and all of the software I use is made for Windows. I guess some can be made to run on other operating systems (Visual Studio being a huge exception and an immediate dealbreaker for me), but I'd rather spend my time using my tools and actually getting work done, instead of hacking my wine settings just to prove some idiotic point, and getting my stuff to half-run at best.

    And finally, I never understood how the Mac claims to be the best on usability, yet they never got mouse acceleration right.

    Regarding secure boot, it can be disabled. And if you know how to install Linux, you are definitely adult enough to disable it yourself. F8 when booting is something I last used like on Windows 98. I'm all for faster boot times, and you can get your rescue menu with the Windows install disk. Hardly something that affects usability. (Nobody complains about the exact same things Mac OS X has always had though)

    In conclusion, Windows 8 is insanely better than Windows 7; discarding it because of some minor cosmetic issues is more something my aunt would say, but not something I'd expect from a self proclaimed computer expert.

    If Mac OS got mouse acceleration right, cared a bit about backward compatibility, got itself some decent programming tools, supported just a bit more than the extremely limited amount of hardware it does, and removed its idiotic jailing features so I can run it on whatever piece of hardware I like, I could probably actually start enjoying working on it.

    Posted 1 year ago # Quote
  5. maid said:

    And then

    Last time I checked it was called "Ubuntu"... :(

    Attachments

    1. nitpicking.jpg 1 year old
    Posted 1 year ago # Quote
  6. pilu said:

    Indeed.

    Also his secure boot instructions are wrong.

    I've done this before to send the crap OS to hell.

    More errors in his post as much as I don't like the kind of company Apple has become what he said on mac is inaccurate.

    There are no jailing features on the Mac the OS doesn't even require activation.
    It Does try to make you register but you can command X this.

    There is nothing stopping running an alternative OS on a mac.
    But yes OSX supports a narrow set of hardware ie only things Apple made but it's still very easy to build a Mac clone.

    Posted 1 year ago # Quote
  7. Char said:

    Indeed.

    Funny how that's the only point you can contradict.

    Just curious, why are you disabling Secure Boot? The only three reasons I can think of are: you want to install a different OS (in which case, why did you get a Windows 8 PC?), you want to do some kernel hacking (in which case you should probably know what you're doing, instead of trying to follow some random YouTube video), or you want to prove an idiotic point while removing a very useful security feature against rootkits.

    I wonder what it is...

    Posted 1 year ago # Quote
  8. maid said:

    Funny how that's the only point you can contradict.

    Just curious, why are you disabling Secure Boot? The only three reasons I can think of are: you want to install a different OS (in which case, why did you get a Windows 8 PC?), you want to do some kernel hacking (in which case you should probably know what you're doing, instead of trying to follow some random YouTube video), or you want to prove an idiotic point while removing a very useful security feature against rootkits.

    I wonder what it is...

    It's not really a default defense and it won't belong before virus writers defeat it.
    http://www.thetrozone.com/uefi-secure-boot-%E2%80%93-its-not-about-security-all

    If you depend on this one piece of security for protection you deserve to and will get hacked.

    And why would I turn it off so I can install Linux that's why.
    I even destroyed the restore partition as I can get a new windows image without all the shovel ware from the OEM.
    Now this is another reason why I dispise 8 with 7,Vista, and XP all I needed was a good COA I did not need to backup the restore partition I could simply delete it.
    You complain about what OSX comes with the trash that comes with most windows PCs is so much worse.
    Ever see the garbage that a Dell ships with you have to spend the better part of an hour cleaning it out just so you can use it?
    Seriously you're just trolling now and it's a rather pathetic attempt.

    Attachments

    1. PB_get_GTFO.gif 1 year old
    Posted 1 year ago # Quote
  9. Char said:
    Seriously you're just rolling now and it's a rather pathetic attempt.

    Speaking of being defensive...

    Posted 1 year ago # Quote
  10. aneko said:

    Speaking of being defensive...

    Sorry I got a little angry there but the nit picking really annoyed me as something very childish.

    MS's attempt to lock me out of my own hardware and call it a security feature, making an already restrictive end user agreement even more so, and the forcing me to use a UI that gets in my way was something that royally pissed me off.

    The first two are actually worse in my book then the metro UI.

    Posted 1 year ago # Quote
  11. Char said:

    It's not really a default defense and it won't belong before virus writers defeat it.
    http://www.thetrozone.com/uefi-secure-boot-%E2%80%93-its-not-about-security-all

    Exactly what part of that article is talking about vulnerabilities in UEFI? If somebody here is trolling, it's definitely the writer of that article.

    Char said:
    If you depend on this one piece of security for protection you deserve to and will get hacked.

    So you're saying something like "I won't lock my house, because it won't belong (sic) before thieves make a master key and defeat my lock. Besides, if you depend on one piece of security for your house protection, you deserve to and will get burglarized".

    Remind me to never hire you as a security consultant.

    Conspiracy theories aside, Secure Boot is not required to be undisableable in x86_64 for a computer to be certified for Windows 8. In fact, you're encouraged to disable it if you're going to install another OS, like you claim to. In fact, you can, and should get Secure Boot enabled once you finish installing Linux to re-establish a chain of trust, because as you certainly know, Secure Boot is OS-agnostic:

    https://www.linuxfoundation.org/sites/main/files/lf_uefi_secure_boot_open_platforms.pdf

    Some observers have
    expressed concerns that secure boot could be used to exclude open systems from the market,
    but, as we have shown above, there is no need for things to be that way. If vendors ship their
    systems in the setup mode and provide a means to add new KEKs to the firmware, those systems
    will fully support open operating systems while maintaining compliance with the Windows 8 logo
    requirements

    If you can't get your Secure Boot disabled on your PC by following a YouTube video, you should complain to the person who made that video. Failing that, you should contact the manufacturer of your specific PC for specific instructions.

    Char said:
    You complain about what OSX comes with the trash that comes with most windows PCs is so much worse.
    Ever see the garbage that a Dell ships with you have to spend the better part of an hour cleaning it out just so you can use it?

    Not really, I assemble my own PCs since 1996.

    Posted 1 year ago # Quote
  12. I used the video as a how to for the benefit of others in the thread I had no trouble disabling mine.
    The instruction for to kill it on my laptop were simple.

    Completely shut down your computer.
    Power on the system. As soon as the first logo screen appears, immediately press Delete to enter the BIOS.
    Use the right arrow key to select Authentication.
    With Secure Boot highlighted, press Enter and then the down arrow to select Disabled.
    Use the right arrow key to select Boot Options.
    With Launch CSM highlighted, press Enter and use the down arrow to select Always.
    Press Enter.
    Press the F10 key to save changes and restart the system

    My big gripe with secure boot is it's really about anti piracy and making things difficult for the user.
    There is no more COA it's now a key stored in the bios along with a hardware signature.
    If you need to restore you can't just directly go to pro you must first install what came with the hardware then upgrade to pro more stupid and pointless hoops to jump through.

    http://www.microsoft.com/oem/en/licensing/sblicensing/Pages/index.aspx#fbid=CXYaHT_K2YT

    The good news you can crack activation 3.0 just like 2.1.

    As for desktops I've always built or modified them.
    I change the hardware on my desktops fairly often and have broke activation a few times during a hardware upgrade.

    I think Microsoft may have finally shot themselves in the foot on 8.

    This may be just the opportunity for alternatives.
    On hardware support the situation is no longer how it was in 2002.
    I now rarely encounter hardware that does not work under Linux.
    In fact I find Linux hardware setup even easier then windows.
    The only driver I had to go find was my printer's and that was easy just two files and two lines entered in console.

    Posted 1 year ago # Quote
  13. Maid has it right here: Agree with him almost 100% (although I dont know why you are getting rid of OSX chess :<).

    But the best part of OSX is the UNIX underpinnings meaning you can do whatever the hell you want with the terminal and the support by 3rd parties like adobe on top.

    Posted 1 year ago # Quote
  14. Windows 8 was design for Phones and Tablets not for desktop computers and laptops.Everyone knows that Windows Phone 8 another version of Windows Phone.I never really care hype of OS if it can work effectively and adapt with applications that I can use I would use it.

    Posted 1 year ago # Quote
  15. Myballz said:
    Windows 8 was design for Phones and Tablets not for desktop computers and laptops.Everyone knows that Windows Phone 8 another version of Windows Phone.I never really care hype of OS if it can work effectively and adapt with applications that I can use I would use it.

    No. Windows 8 is designed for PC's new iteration 6 months - 1 year in the future.

    Windows phone 8 is a complete new branch from Windows phone. It does not even use the same kernel

    Posted 1 year ago # Quote
  16. spacesavage said:

    No. Windows 8 is designed for PC's new iteration 6 months - 1 year in the future.

    Windows phone 8 is a complete new branch from Windows phone. It does not even use the same kernel

    You do realize your scenario relies on a leap of faith without any indication it'll succeed, just like 3D TV's being the "Next Big Thing".

    Posted 1 year ago # Quote
  17. spacesavage said:

    No. Windows 8 is designed for PC's new iteration 6 months - 1 year in the future.

    No metro was designed for tablets and phones and there it's a partial success.
    Windows phone did not really displace the intrenched Android and iOS platforms but it was not a complete failure either.

    But they incorrectly thought the same UI could work for a desktop and there it's been a failure.

    How bad did it fail let just say Mac sales are up 30% for first quarter of 2013 and this is now being called the year of the Linux desktop.

    If Microsoft was smart they'd listen to their users and admit metro has no place on a desktop PCs are not phones and nor are they ipads.
    They also should back a little on some of the nastier things such as activation 3.0 and suggesting OEMs lock the UEFI.
    It should not be a hassle to do a clean install,downgrade the OS,or install a different OS all together.
    This should be no more difficult then it was on BIOS based PCs in fact it should be easier then it was before.
    The OS also is very over priced $199 is way to much for something that is a minor upgrade from 7 or even Vista.

    I find 8 is the worst version of windows I have ever used this includes everything from 3.11 to 7 and I even tried to give it a chance by installing classic shell.

    Posted 1 year ago # Quote
  18. Char said:

    How bad did it fail let just say Mac sales are up 30% for first quarter of 2013 and this is now being called the year of the Linux desktop.

    You are trolling yes? It has been called the year of the linux desktop every year since 2002

    Char said:

    If Microsoft was smart they'd listen to their users and admit metro has no place on a desktop PCs are not phones and nor are they ipads.

    If MS listened to their consumers we would not have had windows XP, OR the needed jump to NT 6

    Posted 1 year ago # Quote
  19. spacesavage said:

    You are trolling yes? It has been called the year of the linux desktop every year since 2002

    No this is not an attempt to troll but what many experts are saying.
    http://www.slashgeek.net/2013/02/13/year-of-linux-desktop/

    One thing I noticed is a lot has changed since 2002.
    Linux is much more mature now then it was back then.
    I remember having to manually configure X11 ,only a select few wireless cards working, most codecs being non existent etc.

    Microsoft is no longer the unchallengeable giant it once was.
    Google and Apple have beaten it on mobile.
    Windows may have had it's greatest marketing failure since Windows Me.

    Some say in a way it's already happened as Linux has ruled the server space for years,and is the underpinnings for Android and Chrome OS.

    Posted 1 year ago # Quote
  20. An OS is much more than just its GUI, you know.

    Posted 1 year ago # Quote

Reply »

You must log in to post.