Sankaku Complex Forums » General

The Space Thread

  1. pinkturtlefart said:
    http://gizmodo.com/5974389/if-there-are-17-billion-earth+sized-worlds-in-our-galaxy-the-universe-is-bubbling-with-life

    It makes me wonder if there are other turtles out there. When I look into the stars I can't help but imagine that somewhere a billion light years away someone else is thinking the same thing.

    That's an interesting story it seems to suggest we're almost certainly not alone in the universe.

    Just in our own galaxy there may be as many as 170 civilizations.

    Though the bad news they'd still be so far apart they'll probably never make contact with each other unless they invent an effective warp drive or some other means of FTL travel.

    But still the idea of other civilizations existing is a very uplifting one.

    Posted 1 year ago # Quote
  2. Char said:
    the idea of other civilizations existing is a very uplifting one.

    Unless they're all stupid.

    Posted 1 year ago # Quote
  3. Here you go, Pink Turtle Fart, the First Ancestral Race:

    Attachments

    1. far.jpg 1 year old
    Posted 1 year ago # Quote
  4. Hmmm. I see

    Posted 1 year ago # Quote
  5. In space, no one can hear you scream.

    Attachments

    1. IMG_7189.JPG 1 year old
    Posted 1 year ago # Quote
  6. An interesting Soviet era video about nuclear rocket engines.

    It seems it pretty much was the Russian Neva.

    Posted 1 year ago # Quote
  7. Dextre successfully refuels a mock satellite a major test for space robotic servicing.

    Posted 1 year ago # Quote
  8. MIXED NUTS IN SPACE!!!

    Posted 1 year ago # Quote
  9. Solar System Simulator for anyone interested:
    http://www.stumbleupon.com/su/1yqBEq/:lHCSj3n!:87lAYQhy/www.solarsystemscope.com/

    Posted 1 year ago # Quote
  10. South Korea's first successful satellite launch.

    Posted 1 year ago # Quote
  11. Char said:
    South Korea's first successful satellite launch.

    Satellite? What satellite?

    Attachments

    1. x-37b.JPG 1 year old
    Posted 1 year ago # Quote
  12. Char said:
    A large meteor exploded over Russia.

    Sounds of explosing are pretty nice too!

    And view from another city Yekaterinburg, which is 250 km from Chelyabinsk.

    Posted 1 year ago # Quote
  13. I think a side effect of this there will be NASA is going to get the funding for their asteroid missions and the Russian space program might get increased funding.

    Deep Space Industries also could spin this to attract more investors.

    The asteroid that flew by today supposedly unrelated to the meteor is worth billions in metals.
    http://www.space.com/19758-asteroid-worth-billions-2012-da14-flyby.html

    Posted 1 year ago # Quote
  14. Meteor Update! It happened again!

    A bright fireball is reported to have flown over the San Francisco and adjacent Bay area region (California, USA) earlier tonight. (Not as big as the Russian one though).

    Link here.

    Update on Russian meteor here, and Wikipedia entry here.

    Posted 1 year ago # Quote
  15. Are all the astronomers on vacation this week?

    Posted 1 year ago # Quote
  16. Update: February 15, 2013 7pm PST

    New information provided by a worldwide network of sensors has allowed scientists to refine their estimates for the size of the object that entered that atmosphere and disintegrated in the skies over Chelyabinsk, Russia, at 7:20:26 p.m. PST, or 10:20:26 p.m. EST on Feb. 14 (3:20:26 UTC on Feb. 15).

    The estimated size of the object, prior to entering Earth's atmosphere, has been revised upward from 49 feet (15 meters) to 55 feet (17 meters), and its estimated mass has increased from 7,000 to 10,000 tons. Also, the estimate for energy released during the event has increased by 30 kilotons to nearly 500 kilotons of energy released. These new estimates were generated using new data that had been collected by five additional infrasound stations located around the world – the first recording of the event being in Alaska, over 6,500 kilometers away from Chelyabinsk. The infrasound data indicates that the event, from atmospheric entry to the meteor's airborne disintegration took 32.5 seconds. The calculations using the infrasound data were performed by Peter Brown at the University of Western Ontario, Canada.

    "We would expect an event of this magnitude to occur once every 100 years on average," said Paul Chodas of NASA's Near-Earth Object Program Office at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. "When you have a fireball of this size we would expect a large number of meteorites to reach the surface and in this case there were probably some large ones."

    The trajectory of the Russia meteor was significantly different than the trajectory of the asteroid 2012 DA14, which hours later made its flyby of Earth, making it a completely unrelated object. The Russia meteor is the largest reported since 1908, when a meteor hit Tunguska, Siberia.

    http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/asteroids/news/asteroid20130215.html

    Posted 1 year ago # Quote
  17. Were you able to see or hear it from your area?

    I wonder why they say a meteor hit Tunguska when there is no impact crater and the fallen trees show a mid air explosion?

    Posted 1 year ago # Quote
  18. The explosion, having the epicentre (60.886°N, 101.894°E), is believed to have been caused by the air burst of a large meteoroid or comet fragment at an altitude of 5–10 kilometres (3–6 mi) above the Earth's surface.
    .
    .
    Although the meteoroid or comet appears to have burst in the air rather than hitting the surface, this event still is referred to as an impact.

    -wiki

    Posted 1 year ago # Quote
  19. palmtop-tiger said:

    I wonder why they say a meteor hit Tunguska when there is no impact crater and the fallen trees show a mid air explosion?

    They're covering for Nikola Tesla and his death ray!

    Posted 1 year ago # Quote

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